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© Montreal Locations Scouts 2014
Header photo Copyrights:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Montreal

Champ de Mars

A huge public expanse surrounded by trees, the perfect place to relax and soak up some sun... a superb view of downtown Montréal... and fascinating historical remains. Can you pick out the two lines of stone running across the surface like a double backbone? This is one of the few spots in present-day Montréal where you can still see physical evidence of the fortified town of yesteryear. In 1991, the site was developed to highlight the remains of the fortifications. Trees that recall the Commissioners’ plan stand guard over this unique legacy. Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/
Old Montreal Champs de Mars

Rue Notre-Dame East

For centuries now, this is where different, and often conflicting, visions of the city have been championed, where decisions have been made and trials heard. The times have changed, of course. Today there are women sitting as judges and on City Council, and nearly as many couples come to the Courthouse for divorces as for marriage licences. But the weight of the solid stone surroundings still lends gravity to the political and legal proceedings.
Old Montreal Rue Notre Dame
The Château Ramezay was one of the first buildings in Québec to be declared a historic monument. It is named for Claude de Ramezay, Governor of Montréal, who had it built as his home in 1705. The Château was later sold to the Compagnie des Indes, which held a monopoly on fur exports, and was remodelled and expanded in 1756, partly on its original foundations. The building served as a Governor's residence again and later as a military headquarters and courthouse, and finally was turned into a museum in 1895. A turret, added in 1903, makes it look even more like a castle, a name derived from its delightful architecture, typical of a hotel particulier in the days of the fortified city. Montréal City Hall has a more turbulent history than its peaceful façade suggests. The building went up between 1872 and 1878, and survived a severe fire in 1922. And it was from this balcony that French President General de Gaulle uttered his famous "Vive le Québec libre!" during a state visit in 1967. Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/
Old Montreal Chateau Ramezay Old Montreal City Hall

Bonsecours

The Bonsecours Market, a jewel in Montréal's heritage crown, was inaugurated in 1847. A symbol of Montréal's heyday, this imposing building was the city's main agricultural marketplace for over a century. It also housed a concert hall and even served as a city hall in the early days of Montréal.  Its symmetrical composition and Greek Revival portico (the cast- iron columns were brought from England), tin-plated dome and simple and varied details make it a perfect illustration of the Neo- classical style in favour at the time. Recent renovations have turned it once again into a bustling marketplace that also features shops and exhibitions. Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/ A beautiful house in the fortified town The Pierre du Calvet house, built in 1770 and nicely restored in 1966, is an impressive sight. But in the 18th-century fortified town, the customers of the owner, a Huguenot merchant and supporter of the American Revolution, probably saw nothing unusual about the building. With its steeply pitched roof, its fieldstone walls secured with "S"-shaped iron bars and its casement windows, it was typical of the period. Note the end walls, which extend above the line of the roof as fire breaks. This type of construction became mandatory after the great fire of 1721. Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/
Montréal City Hall has a more turbulent history than its peaceful façade suggests. The building went up between 1872 and 1878, and survived a severe fire in 1922. And it was from this balcony that French President General de Gaulle uttered his famous "Vive le Québec libre!" during a state visit in 1967. (Listen closely and you can still hear the crowds roaring.) Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/
Old Montreal Old Montreal Bonsecours Market Old Montreal house

Place Jacques-Cartier

The square was built here by the city in the first half of the 19th century, but this initiative was simply an acknowledgement of a much older reality. As archaeologists have found, people have gathered at this site for generations. It has always been one of the most popular spots in Montréal!  shops and exhibitions. When the Bonsecours Market opened for business in 1847, the "old" New Marketplace was demolished and turned into Place Jacques-Cartier. Market gardeners and craftspeople continued to offer their wares as an outdoor extension of the New Marketplace, however. When the Bonsecours Market opened for business in 1847, the "old" New Marketplace was demolished and turned into Place Jacques-Cartier. Market gardeners and craftspeople continued to offer their wares as an outdoor extension of the New Marketplace, however. Built during the same period, these houses mark changes in architectural styles after 1800, notably the use of cut stone façades. Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/
Old Montreal Place Jacques Cartier

Rue Saint-Amable

On Rue Saint-Amable, you find yourself surrounded by the ebbing and flowing crowds; shopkeepers and artists call out to you, employing all their charm and talent to sell their wares. In days gone by, voices also echoed from these stone walls—discussing politics, as always, and the recent price hikes... for beaver pelts. In the inner courtyards, shopkeepers and craftspeople seek your custom, just as they always have. The products may change, but business endures...
Old Montreal Rue St-Amable

Rue Saint-Paul

Now we are on Montréal's oldest street. Here, at the confluence of the city and the Port, warehouse-shops once welcomed customers through their front entrances on Rue Saint-Paul and brought in goods through their back doors on de la Commune. Art galleries, shops, restaurants, shows at Deux Pierrots... Rue Saint-Paul has regained its former vibrant character with the rediscovery of Old Montréal. Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/
Old Montreal Rue St-Paul
Websites:
Phone :  +1 514-900-0897
Montreal and areas photo locations scouts, locations managers, Montreal photo locations libraries, Montreal Locations databases and Montreal photography productions services as well as film, video and television Montreal Locations Scouts

Champ de Mars

© Montreal Locations Scouts 2014
Header photo Copyrights:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Montreal
A huge public expanse surrounded by trees, the perfect place to relax and soak up some sun... a superb view of downtown Montréal... and fascinating historical remains. Can you pick out the two lines of stone running across the surface like a double backbone? This is one of the few spots in present-day Montréal where you can still see physical evidence of the fortified town of yesteryear. In 1991, the site was developed to highlight the remains of the fortifications. Trees that recall the Commissioners’ plan stand guard over this unique legacy. Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/

Rue Notre-Dame East

For centuries now, this is where different, and often conflicting, visions of the city have been championed, where decisions have been made and trials heard. The times have changed, of course. Today there are women sitting as judges and on City Council, and nearly as many couples come to the Courthouse for divorces as for marriage licences. But the weight of the solid stone surroundings still lends gravity to the political and legal proceedings. Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/
The Château Ramezay was one of the first buildings in Québec to be declared a historic monument. It is named for Claude de Ramezay, Governor of Montréal, who had it built as his home in 1705. The Château was later sold to the Compagnie des Indes, which held a monopoly on fur exports, and was remodelled and expanded in 1756, partly on its original foundations. The building served as a Governor's residence again and later as a military headquarters and courthouse, and finally was turned into a museum in 1895. A turret, added in 1903, makes it look even more like a castle, a name derived from its delightful architecture, typical of a hotel particulier in the days of the fortified city. Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/ Montréal City Hall has a more turbulent history than its peaceful façade suggests. The building went up between 1872 and 1878, and survived a severe fire in 1922. And it was from this balcony that French President General de Gaulle uttered his famous "Vive le Québec libre!" during a state visit in 1967. Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/

Bonsecours

The Bonsecours Market, a jewel in Montréal's heritage crown, was inaugurated in 1847. A symbol of Montréal's heyday, this imposing building was the city's main agricultural marketplace for over a century. It also housed a concert hall and even served as a city hall in the early days of Montréal.  Its symmetrical composition and Greek Revival portico (the cast-iron columns were brought from England), tin-plated dome and simple and varied details make it a perfect illustration of the Neo-classical style in favour at the time. Recent renovations have turned it once again into a bustling marketplace that also features shops and exhibitions. Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/ A beautiful house in the fortified town The Pierre du Calvet house, built in 1770 and nicely restored in 1966, is an impressive sight. But in the 18th-century fortified town, the customers of the owner, a Huguenot merchant and supporter of the American Revolution, probably saw nothing unusual about the building. With its steeply pitched roof, its fieldstone walls secured with "S"-shaped iron bars and its casement windows, it was typical of the period. Note the end walls, which extend above the line of the roof as fire breaks. This type of construction became mandatory after the great fire of 1721. Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/

Place Jacques-Cartier

The square was built here by the city in the first half of the 19th century, but this initiative was simply an acknowledgement of a much older reality. As archaeologists have found, people have gathered at this site for generations. It has always been one of the most popular spots in Montréal!  shops and exhibitions. When the Bonsecours Market opened for business in 1847, the "old" New Marketplace was demolished and turned into Place Jacques- Cartier. Market gardeners and craftspeople continued to offer their wares as an outdoor extension of the New Marketplace, however. When the Bonsecours Market opened for business in 1847, the "old" New Marketplace was demolished and turned into Place Jacques-Cartier. Market gardeners and craftspeople continued to offer their wares as an outdoor extension of the New Marketplace, however. Built during the same period, these houses mark changes in architectural styles after 1800, notably the use of cut stone façades. Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/
Rue Saint-Paul     Now we are on Montréal's oldest street. Here, at the confluence of the city and the Port, warehouse-shops once welcomed customers through their front entrances on Rue Saint-Paul and brought in goods through their back doors on de la Commune.  Art galleries, shops, restaurants, shows at Deux Pierrots... Rue Saint-Paul has regained its former vibrant character with the rediscovery of Old Montréal.  Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/ On Rue Saint-Amable, you find yourself surrounded by the ebbing and flowing crowds; shopkeepers and artists call out to you, employing all their charm and talent to sell their wares. In days gone by, voices also echoed from these stone walls—discussing politics, as always, and the recent price hikes... for beaver pelts. In the inner courtyards, shopkeepers and craftspeople seek your custom, just as they always have. The products may change, but business endures... Credit/Copyrights: http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/  Rue Saint-Amable
Direct Phone Number: 514-880-6372
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